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Installation Print

 

Versiplast Can 1Gallon Look for this label.

The Pearls and Metals line is by far the most flexible group of coatings for creating a myriad of different effects with complete control and product compatibility. Do not be afraid to try new things. This system is extremely durable and water resistant.

MAKE YOUR OWN TACK RAG:  Using 3M spray glue, blast a piece of cheesecloth with the glue and voila a tack rag. Never buy them again! This rag picks up dust very effeciently and costs 1/10 the cost of store bought.

 Installation

SKIMCOATING OF DECORATIVE PLASTERS;

It will become necessary in many applications to begin with a proper skimcoat of decorative plaster. A proper skimcoat creates a surface that is both smooth, and free from all deviations. To accomplish this the original surface must first be prepared as shown in step #1 below. Once the surface has been properly prepared skimcoating may begin. Apply the venetian plaster or BC-101/BC-105 on to the entire surface using a broadknife in large sweeping curves, the more random the skimcoat the better. The skimcoat must be kept tight and smooth. Most surfaces will be adequately covered in two passes of skimcoat, however it may be necessary to apply a third if the surface does not appear smooth and free of imperfections after two skimcoats. It is possible with experience to render a surface completely smooth and free of imperfections in a single controlled skimcoat. However it is recommended to take the longer route until you become comforatable with the technique.

THE SKIP TROWEL FINISH:                    BCPT-106-IV

                   Step #1 start by preparing the surface to accept the treatment. With an existing surface it is usually possible to apply directly on to it. High gloss surfaces should be sanded with 120 grit paper before commencing  * remember to always check for wax or wallpaper glue residue before starting( these need to be dealt with before beginning remove sizing or residue with T.S.P.).  If the surface is new, eliminate any possibility of coating failure by priming the surface in an oil primer, B-I-N SHELLAC BASE is preferred. Although shellac primer is methyl hydrate based the quicker dry time is worth it ! oil based will give simalar results , but slower dry.These primers will prevent any re-emulsification of the undercoat, that could result in cracking (as tends to occur with latex primers). If installation over existing papered surfaces is unavoidable then prime the surface in oil / shellac primer, , but remember to remove any paper that is peeling or can be removed without much effort (sand torn paper edges to minimize their visibility in the final finish,and prevent lift) then sand the primer after it has dried with 120 grit sandpaper. Vinyl/paper should be fully removed in damp environments as it can trap moisture and rot the substrate( then remove sizing or residue with T.S.P.). Fill any severe imperfections with Versiplast (or equivelent) before beginning. Some fully settled surfaces will exhibit long cracks in varying widths ie/ older structures, these should be treated with a flexible latex, paintable caulking ( press deeply into crack then wipe smooth with a damp sponge) allow to dry 24 hours before priming or decorative plaster work).

            Step #2 The finish can begin one of two ways,skim first skip trowel second or skip trowel first skim second. Skip trowelling first is the quicker, more effecient method.If skip trowelling first is the chosen technique then;

Begin by placing the BC-101/BC-105  plaster across the long edge of the trowel (do not overload the trowel). There should be about 3/8 " of plaster across the blades full edge, now touch the trowel to the surface and move your hand in a random fashion ( the shape of an S works well) the pressure required to transfer plaster from the trowel to the surface is very minimal it is imperative that the thickness of the skip trowelled plaster be  approximately 1/8" higher than the surface. this will allow the coating the opportunity to begin to set (dry) against the surface, but not at the high edge, this means that you can texture at least 40- 60 ft. sq. before coming back to the still wet skip trowelled areas, roughly 6- 10 minutes from the time you first skip trowel before coming back over these areas and laying a loose skim coat over top. This will fill in blank areas between skip trowelled areas as well as causing the still wet high areas to be carried along the surface with your skim coat. The skip trowel pattern will not be obliterated during this process because during the 6 - 10 minutes that it has sat on the surface an approximately 1/32" thickness of the skip trowel will have set up. It is important that the skip trowel step not be too thin as too much will dry in the 6 - 10 minute period, leaving too high of a relief pattern. This layer should be allowed to fully dry before finishing with the final coat. For the final pass scrape the surface  dry and skim a tight random coat of basecoat plaster over top, depending on the speed of this final skim coat, you should only lay up between 10 - 30 sq. ft. It is recommended that you see this technique rendered before trying it.

        Step #2 There should now be a surface which has been fully skimcoated and has a relief texture to it. When this layer has fully dried Tocoating may now begin. The surface should be lightly scraped and sanded with 180 grey paper, in preparation of the topcoat( remove dust after sanding). Remove topcoat from container onto the trowel (a broadknife is recommended). Now skim the topcoat onto the surface with  medium pressure this will discharge topcoat onto the surface and you will immediately begin to see all the movement that is below. ontinue across the entire surface until all areas have been covered. Allow this layer to dry to the touch and then following the same procedure (there is no need to sand or scrape the topcoat), apply the second color of topcoat if required.NOTE* ONLY ONE EDGE OF THE BROADKNIFE SHOULD EVER BE USED FOR APPLICATION!!!

If skip trowelling last is the chosen technique then;

A proper skimcoat must first be applied (see above). After the skimcoat has dried lay up the texture for your finish. For an acceptable skip trowel texture over skimcoat, the height of the skip trowel pass shoul be controlled to a minimum thickness to avoid a choppy overly textured finish(THINNER IS BETTER HERE). This will require a learned skill level that must be practiced to perfection before commencing to surface. When skip trowelling over a skimcoat it will sometimes be difficult to see where you have textured as the plaster begins to dry. A truly effective skip troweled texture should be rendered in two passes to ensure good overall coverage of the pattern. Once the skip trowel texture has dried, topcoating may begin. The surface should be lightly scraped or sanded with 180 grey paper, in preparation of the topcoat. Remove topcoat from container onto the trowel (a broadknife is recommended). Now skim the topcoat onto the surface with  medium pressure this will discharge topcoat onto the surface and you will immediately begin to see all the movement that is below. ontinue across the entire surface until all areas have been covered. Allow this layer to dry to the touch and then following the same procedure (there is no need to sand or scarpe the topcoat), apply the second color of topcoat if required.NOTE* EVERYONE WILL HAVE A UNIQUE HAND ,keep this in mind and either get everyone on the same page or render this stage alone!

THE KNOCKDOWN / HAMMERED FINISH:     silver night shown.

This is one of the easiest and most visually stunning techniques ever. Any basecoat color and metallic topcoat can be used to render this finish.

         Step #1 start by preparing the surface to accept the treatment. With an existing surface it is usually possible to apply directly on to it. High gloss surfaces should be sanded with 120 grit paper before commencing  * remember to always check for wax or wallpaper glue residue before starting( these need to be dealt with before beginning remove sizing or residue with T.S.P.).  If the surface is new, eliminate any possibility of coating failure by priming the surface in an oil primer, B-I-N SHELLAC BASE is preferred. Although shellac primer is methyl hydrate based the quicker dry time is worth it ! oil based will give simalar results , but slower dry.These primers will prevent any re-emulsification of the undercoat, that could result in cracking (as tends to occur with latex primers). If installation over existing papered surfaces is unavoidable then prime the surface in oil / shellac primer, , but remember to remove any paper that is peeling or can be removed without much effort (sand torn paper edges to minimize their visibility in the final finish,and prevent lift) then sand the primer after it has dried with 120 grit sandpaper. Vinyl/paper should be fully removed in damp environments as it can trap moisture and rot the substrate( then remove sizing or residue with T.S.P.). Fill any severe imperfections with Versiplast (or equivelent) before beginning. Some fully settled surfaces will exhibit long cracks in varying widths ie/ older structures, these should be treated with a flexible latex, paintable caulking ( press deeply into crack then wipe smooth with a damp sponge) allow to dry 24 hours before priming or decorative plaster work).

 Step #2 Using the BC-101/BC-105 plaster begin by skimcoating the entire surface area. all deviations and imperfections . When the skimcoat has dried, place a fair quantity of BC-101/BC-105 plaster into a paint tray (approximately 2 quarts). Keep a wet rag over the product to ensure that it does not dry in the tray. You can thin the BC-101/BC-105 with water to make rolling easier. Now charge the sea sponge roller (as seen on products page"tools") with BC-101/BC-105 plasterand roll onto surface in an even pattern. To achieve an even pattern you must learn how much pressure to use when releasing the plaster onto the surface. Try to have a light hand when initially making contact with the surface and allow the pressure to increase as plaster discharges onto surface. It is recommended that your roll stroke take on a random x type motion, as this allows for more control, recharge the roller  before plaster runs out on the sponge. It is vitally important that you begin to knock back the plaster before it has time to begin setting up. A good rule is to roll out approximately 4-5 ft. sq. then knock it back, then continue the process. The knockdown procedure is best performed with a broadknife (as seen on product page "tools"), and the stroke that works best is again an x type movement. You should see the plaster spread from many small dots into a larger, flatter pattern. Dont be too concerned about missing areas as you can go back across the surface a second time and fill in undesirable patches. It is actually reccommended that you make a full second pass with the sea sponge roller technique to achieve a consistant knockdown pattern. The danger in allowing the plaster to sit on the surface too long before knocking it down is that the plaster will sit up too high on the surface creating an unwanted relief.

Step #3 When this layer has fully dried Tocoating may now begin. The surface should be lightly scraped or sanded with 180 grey paper, in preparation of the topcoat (dust the surface after sanding). Remove topcoat from container onto the trowel (a broadknife is recommended). Now skim the topcoat onto the surface with  medium pressure this will discharge topcoat onto the surface and you will immediately begin to see all the movement that is below. Continue across the entire surface until all areas have been covered. Allow this layer to dry to the touch and then following the same procedure (there is no need to sand or scrape the topcoat), apply the second color of topcoat if required.The second topcoat can also be rolled on with the sea sponge roller to allow a more contrasting overall appearance. Remember to troel the topcoat down while it is still wet to push it into the pattern.

Step #4 (OPTIONAL); To create very dramatic multicolored effects, several colors of basecoat can be rolled simultaneously and then finished with several colors of topcoat. Stencils and lining papers can be used to further dramatize the final effects.

Note* Do not allow topcoat to build up on prep tapes as removal of the tapes under these conditions could result in some topcoat being removed.

Blending products : Using base coat and top coat.

Our products were designed to be compatible with one another so that mixing and blending them results in different and unique finishes. One such blend is after you have completed a base and topcoat finish simply blend the basecoat and the topcoat in a separate container at a 50/50 ratio and using your trowel apply a layer of this mixture over your surface. The result is a much more subtle finish with a flat/satin sheen.